Pacific Octopus and Squid


Stubby Squid Giant Pacific Octopus Giant Pacific Octopus, Quadra Island BC Red Octopus Stubby Squid Pacific Red Octopus, Clover Point BC Giant Pacific Octopus Stubby Squid, Ogden Point Breakwater Giant Pacifc Octopus, Dolphin Beach BC Giant Pacific Octopus, Quadra Island BC Stubby Squid, Ogden Point Breakwater Giant Pacific Octopus, Ogden Point BC Giant Pacifc Octopus, Dolphin Beach BC Giant Pacifc Octopus, Clark Rock BC Giant Pacific Octopus Giant Pacifc Octopus, Swordfish Island BC Giant Pacifc Octopus, Swordfish Island BC Pacific Red Octopus, Clover Point BC Red Octopus Giant Pacific Octopus at Swordfish Island Giant Pacific Octopus Pacific Red Octopus at Spring Bay Giant Pacific Octopus at Dolphin Beach Giant Pacific Octopus Stubby Squid Red Octopus Stubby Squid Red Octopus Stubby Squid Giant Pacific Octopus Stubby Squid Red Octopus Stubby Squid

No adventure beneath the sea is complete without an encounter with this charismatic denizen of the myth and lore. Nicknamed the "devilfish" by those who dare to enter its realm, this creature of legend can stir up feelings rivaling those of the shark.

Octopuses and squids are members of the cephalopod family. These exclusively marine animals are characterized by their bilateral body symmetry, a prominent head, and a set of arms or tentacles modified from the primitive molluscan foot. 

Cephalopods became dominant during the Ordovician period, represented by primitive nautiloids. The class now contains two, only distantly related, subclasses: Coleoidea, which includes octopuses, squid, and cuttlefish; and Nautiloidea, which includes nautilus and allonautilus. In the Coleoidea class, the molluscan shell has been internalized or is absent, whereas in the Nautiloidea class the external shell remains. About 800 living species of cephalopods have been identified.

There are only a few species of octopus and squid that inhabit the temperate waters of the Pacific Northwest. These animals can be found at all depths and come in a variety of sizes, the largest being the Giant Pacific Octopus which also is the largest cephalopod in the world.

 

Giant Pacific Octopus - Enteroctopus dofleini

Giant Pacific Octopus   Giant Pacific Octopus   Giant Pacific Octopus

Giant Pacific Octopus - Enteroctopus dofleini

Giant Pacific Octopus Species Information and Images

 

Pacific Red Octopus - Octopus rubescens

Red Octopus   Red Octopus   Red Octopus

Pacific Red Octopus - Octopus rubescens

Pacific Red Octopus Species Information and Images

 

Stubby Squid - Rossia pacifica

      Stubby Squid   Stubby Squid   Stubby Squid

Stubby Squid - Rossia pacifica

Stubby Squid Species Information and Images

 

Other octopus and squid of the Pacific Northwest

Smoothskin Octopus - Benthoctopus leioderma

Opalescent Squid - Loligo opalescents

Humboldt Squid - Dosidicus gigas

Neon Flying Squid - Ommastrephes bartrami

North Pacific Giant Squid - Onykia robusta

Giant Squid - Architeuthis dux